Service Tree

The Service Tree lists all services in "branched" groups, starting with the very general and moving to the very specific. Click on the name of any group name to see the sub-groups available within it. Click on a service code to see its details and the providers who offer that service.

Academic Records

Programs that maintain and, where appropriate, provide official copies of student academic records; or which evaluate the educational records of foreign students for educational equivalency.

Beer/Liquor Licenses and Permits

Programs that issue licenses that provide written authorization for bars, restaurants and other similar establishments to serve alcoholic beverages to the public. Also included are programs that issue special occasion permits for events held in public places where alcohol is to be sold or served, such as weddings, fundraisers and receptions.

Birth Certificates

Programs that maintain and, where appropriate, provide copies of birth certificates, i.e., documents which certify the date and place of a person's birth as well as his/her parentage. Available in most jurisdictions are authorized copies which are required to obtain a driver’s license, passport, Social Security card and other services related to an individual’s identity; and informational copies which cannot be used to establish a person’s identity. Only individuals designated by law have access to authorized copies of a person's birth certificate.

Court Records

Programs that maintain and, where appropriate, provide access to official documentation of trial proceedings, exhibits and orders, word-for-word testimony, verdicts and judgments in specific actions or suits.

Death Related Records/Permits

Programs that issue, maintain and, where appropriate, provide access to or copies of documents that relate to an individual's death.

Driver Licenses

Programs that issue permits which provide written authorization for an individual to operate a motor vehicle on public roads and highways following successful completion of a written and/or driving examination and a vision test. These programs also renew driver licenses that are about to expire, replace driver licenses that are lost or stolen, and process name and address changes.

Driver License Testing Sites

Programs that establish facilities where people can come to take their written driver's examination and/or road test. Some sites may be limited to a particular type of test, e.g., a weighing station that provides testing for commercial drivers. Included are both the sites where examinations are conducted and the organizations that oversee them.

Food Handling Permits

Programs that offer permits which authorize the holder to work in the kitchens of food establishments such as restaurants and cafeterias preparing and serving food.

Identification Cards

Programs that issue documentation that is designed to prove the identity of the person carrying it.

Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers

Tax processing numbers issued in the United States by the Internal Revenue Service to certain nonresident and resident aliens, their spouses, and dependents who are unable to get a Social Security Number (SSN). Applicants must complete and submit a Form W-7 with required documentation substantiating foreign/alien status and the individual's true identity. Applicants may either mail the documentation, along with the Form W-7, to the closest IRS Service Center, present it at an IRS walk-in office, or process the application through an Acceptance Agent authorized by the IRS. Applicants not currently in the U.S. can apply from abroad.

Medical Records

Programs that maintain and, where appropriate, provide access to the cumulative history of a person's interaction with the health care system such as the occasions on which they have been examined, evaluated or treated for an ailment. Included are medical history records, a longitudinal record of what has happened to a patient since birth including diseases, major and minor illnesses and growth history which can give a clinician a feel for what has happened before to a new patient; inpatient care medical records (hospital records) which generally include admission notes, on-service notes, progress notes, preoperative notes, operative notes, postoperative notes, procedure notes and discharge notes; and a patient's case history with a particular health care provider which usually includes information gained by a physician by asking specific questions, with the aim of obtaining information useful in formulating a diagnosis and providing medical care to the patient. The medically relevant complaints reported by the patient are referred to as symptoms, in contrast with clinical signs, which are ascertained by direct examination by medical personnel. In addition are electronic health records (or EHRs), a systematized collection of a patient's electronically stored health information in a digital format. EHRs may include a range of data including demographics, medical history, medication and allergies, immunization status, laboratory test results, radiology images, vital signs, personal statistics like age and weight, and billing information. EHR systems are designed to store data accurately and to capture the state of a patient across time. It eliminates the need to track down a patient's previous paper medical records and assists in ensuring data is up-to-date, accurate and legible. It also allows open communication between the patient and the provider, while providing privacy and security.

Military Records

Programs that maintain and, where appropriate, provide copies of documents which relate to an individual's association with any of the branches of the armed forces including the person’s current active military status and discharge, if appropriate. Also included are programs that are responsible for investigating and correcting errors in the records of individuals who have served in the armed forces.

Motor Vehicle Registration

Programs that issue license plates for automobiles and other motor vehicles as evidence that the vehicles have been registered with the proper authorities and are authorized to be parked or driven on public roads and highways.

Parking Permits

Programs that issue special decals or other official devices that authorize the bearer to park his or her vehicle in specified restricted areas. Included are parking stickers for people who have disabilities; overnight, weekend or special events parking passes; and other similar permits.

Passports

Public sector offices known as passport acceptance facilities that have been authorized by the U.S. Department of State to accept and verify the documents, applicant signatures and identity for passport applications; place all of the documents and required photos into a specially sealed, tamperproof envelope that may only be opened by State Department officials; and forward them for processing. This is required for ALL passport applicants for a new adult passport, child (minor) passport, or lost, stolen or damaged passport applications. Most passport acceptance facilities are found in local post offices, county clerk's offices and some library locations. Passports are official documents which identify citizens, serve as written authorization from government authorities for citizens to travel abroad and, in effect, request foreign powers to allow bearers to enter and pass freely and safely. U.S. passports can be renewed by mail provided that the old passport was issued within the last 15 years, that the individual was age 16 or older at the time, and that, if applicable, proof of name change is provided. The old valid passport, a color passport photo, a completed DS-82 form and a check or money order for the fee must be submitted.

Social Security Numbers

Programs that provide Social Security cards for people who need to register for employment, report their taxes and track their Social Security benefits. Also included are programs that replace Social Security cards when they are lost or stolen.

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